I Loved These Books…and You Might, Too

There are few things I love more than discovering a great book – and then recommending it. With Labor Day upon us, I suppose this means summer is truly coming to an end. Take heart! Perhaps you can squeeze one more book in. This summer I was determined to read more, and though I still have a stack and a wish list, here are my summer reads and recommendations:

51EvfaFpHOL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_The Storied Life of A.J. Fiery by Gabrielle Zevin. I loved this book. It’s subtle, and a page-turner. A.J. Fikery is sad. He lives alone, runs a bookstore experiencing its worst sales in history, and his prized and rare collection of Poe poems is stolen! But when someone wrapped in a very small package arrives on his doorstep, A.J. has a chance to start a new life. A love story that may make you cry. A.J. also makes me laugh. I recommend this book!

510bcEfPizL._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein. I absolutely do not read books about dogs and pets; I’m just not that person. But then I began writing a story about a dog (go figure). To get me in the mood I opened this book. Oh, why did I resist so long? You’ll definitely cry. You’ll laugh, too. You won’t be able to put it down even whilst touring the great sites of Europe (true story.) This book was passed, grabbed, and fought over among many members of the family this summer (a few racy parts had to be skipped for children’s sake)!

UnknownWhen Will There Be Good News? by Kate Atkinson. Wow. What a voice, what a way with words. I’m not sure I even liked this book, but I must sing this author’s praises. This book is so English and not exactly an uplifting read. But Atkinson can write! The horrible first scene hooks you and you must know what happens to little Joanna…and Reggie…and Detective Brodie who is down on his luck and hoping to find the one who got away (both love and murder.) In my opinion, Atkinson, is one of the great writers of our time.

Unknown-1 The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. I finally read it. I know, it took me awhile. This is the story of the ability of books to feed the soul. It’s 1939, Nazi Germany. Books are being burned. Jews are being rounded up. Death has never been busier. An orphan, Liesel, steals something she can’t resist: a book. Zusak has a writing style that I had to adjust to – I’m glad I did. Worth the read.

51YUtiQEGDL._SX281_BO1,204,203,200_Suspect, by Robert Crais is the type of fast-paced thriller my husband likes to read at night. I read it because it features a main character named Maggie who is…a dog! Maggie is a bomb sniffer. She teams up with LAPD cop Scott James. Both of them are not doing well. They’ve suffered heavy losses. This is the story of a man and a dog who need each other. I’m now an expert on sniffing and the incredible olfactory bulbs of canines (and you can be too)!

511Y1shNp+L._SX337_BO1,204,203,200_From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by e.l. konigsburg. A middle grade book I loved as a kid and rediscovered on my mother’s bookshelf this summer. It was good (though not quite as good as I remembered) and fun to revisit. It’s a classic, but also startling: children’s literature has evolved!

51CWAtRJpGL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_At the Water’s Edge by Sara Gruen. I wanted to love this book. The premise was fantastic: a young woman and her privileged husband embark on an adventure to prove the existence of the Loch Ness monster. It’s a love story. It’s a historical period. Cope loved this book and read it twice. I wanted to love this book…but it fell a little short for me. I felt the author was holding back.

41qODNLMRnL._SX343_BO1,204,203,200_This is the Story of a Happy Marriage by Ann Patchett. I took a break from fiction and picked up this collection of Patchett’s nonfiction essays, only one of them being on marriage. I WAS BLOWN AWAY by Patchett’s writing skills. I adore her. I long to write like her. Also, I’m fascinated by Ann’s personal life. In addition to being a best selling author, she owns a bookstore in Tennessee (road trip, anyone???). She doesn’t have children. She has a dog. I dog-eared a million pages and underlined hundreds of sentences. I will share this book with you if you want to read it next!

Unknown-2Paper Towns by John Green. Meh. It’s hard for an author, don’t you think, to have a hit like The Fault in Our Stars, and then be measured by it forever? On the other hand, young adult writer Green has gotten better over time and practice – a great take away for any writer. This book is a love story about a good boy, Quentin, worshipping Margo Roth Spiegelman who is not at all the girl he thinks she is. I’ve got this book, and I can loan it!

41nHbHx4BYL._SX338_BO1,204,203,200_The Penderwicks at Point Mouette by Jeanne Birdsall is the third in a series of children’s literature. I read this book to Paige; we love The Penderwicks! It’s the story of four sisters, Hound the dog, and their summer time adventures. Very fun. Very sweet, with nothing deep dark and dangerous. Refreshing.

What am I reading now? Daunted by the weight of the book, I finally broke down and began reading the pulitzer prize winning The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt. It’s GOOD. So far, there is no dog.

And that’s all folks, Maisymak’s summertime reads and recommendations! I’m always looking for recommendations, so pass them along. What did you read this summer and love?

 

 

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5 thoughts on “I Loved These Books…and You Might, Too

  1. Nina

    I’ve read several of those and enjoyed them too! In fact, I just reread a chapter in Patchett’s for the writing class I’m teaching starting next week. I had remembered loving the scene with her husband in the restaurant in Paris where they get in a fight over a word game. The subtleties of the tension was so well described.

    Anyway, I love hearing what people are reading!

    Reply
  2. Jessica Lawson

    Oooh, I love the Anne Patchett book! I’ve got a big pile of new reads, but the coming fall has me longing for familiar favorites like Maeve Binchy. There are a couple of hers that I haven’t read yet, so maybe I’ll pick those up!

    Reply
  3. Julia Tomiak

    I must read Ann Patchett’s essays. You know, we’re so busy, a book of essays sounds do-able right now. I’m glad you finally read The Book Thief – Zusak definitely has his own style – I find it obtrusive at times, but I’m willing to put up with it because he also has some gorgeous lines.
    I’ll pass on Sara Gruen. Loved Water for Elephants, and the movie, but there is so much else to read.
    I just started All the Light We Cannot See and LOVE IT! I’ll post about it on the blog soon.
    Thanks for these micro reviews!

    Reply
  4. Karen C

    I have a book that you must add to your TBR list. I read “The Lemoncholy Life of Annie Aster” by Scott Wilbanks (http://www.scottbwilbanks.com/) over the summer and I loved every page. It is a fantastic novel that has romance, time travel, mystery, suspense and is quite simply a book that you will not be able to put down (perfect for a cozy couch session!) The story follows Annie and her unusual correspondence with a 19th century schoolmarm, Elsbeth,Gundy, from Kansas. Annie lives in modern day San Francisco and finds this mysterious link in her backyard. Out of nowhere appears a mailbox with a letter from Elsbeth stating “Trespass is dealt with at the business end of a shotgun in these parts!” The two have to discover what is connecting these two very different worlds. I absolute adore the characters and the dialogue in this book. It is clever and witty and I really think it is enjoyable from start to finish. Hope you will check it out

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